Robotics 2021 SURE and SROP Research Projects

Robotics Project #1  Let’s Build Some Robots
Faculty Mentor: Necmiye Ozay, necmiye@umich.edu 
Prerequisites: Strong programming skills, mechanical design, 3D printing
Project Details: Open dynamic robot initiative aims to build low cost dynamic robots mostly from 3D printed and off-the-shelf components [1]. The goal of this SURE project is to replicate one or two of the robots proposed as part of this initiative. You will work with a group of 3-4 students and we will provide all the required hardware and components. The main goal will be to follow the instructions in [1] and [2] to build the electrical and mechanical systems of the robot. Once the robots are built, we will work on programming and controlling them to do fun stuff.  
See:
[1] https://open-dynamic-robot-initiative.github.io/
[2] https://github.com/open-dynamic-robot-initiative/open_robot_actuator_hardware
Research Mode: In lab or hybrid

Robotics Project #2  Robot Garden Project: Perception
Faculty Mentor: Dmitry Berenson, dmitryb@umich.edu 
Prerequisites: A computer vision course (e.g. EECS 442) and significant programming experience (e.g. EECS 281)
Project Details: We have built a rooftop garden bed on the roof of the Wilson center and we are working on using a robot to help take care of the garden. Doing so requires algorithms that can detect weeds, identify diseases, and allow the robot to navigate to and around its environment. The student will work with the robot to gather data and implement the latest perception algorithms for one or more of the above tasks.
Research Mode: hybrid

Robotics Project #3  Robot Garden Project: Visual Servoing
Faculty Mentor: Dmitry Berenson, dmitryb@umich.edu 
Prerequisites: Significant programming experience (e.g. EECS 281). EECS 367 or EECS 467 is a plus but not required.
Research Mode: hybrid
Project Details: We have built a rooftop garden bed on the roof of the Wilson center and we are working on using a robot to help take care of the garden. Part of the process of maintaining the garden requires the robot to reach for and pull out weeds. We will do this through visual-servoing control, where the movement of the robot’s arm is based on reducing error between its gripper and some target in the image captured by its camera. The student will implement and test algorithms for visual servoing, including methods that identify robust features in the image.